COVID-19-Related Shutdowns Significantly Affect Regional Ele

|Mar 27|magazine8 min read

PALO ALTO, Calif., March 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published an analysis of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) effects on electricity demand and use in Italy, Spain, New York, and California based on publicly available data.

These diverse electric power systems recorded reductions in peak demand and energy of 3 to 15 percent in the first two to three week days of each region's shelter-in-place order when compared with the previous week and the same week in 2019.1

Italy:

  • During the first two days of the national shelter-in-place, the Italian system recorded reductions in weekday peak demand and energy use of 10 to 14 percent relative to that of the previous week and the same week in 2019.
  • During days five through eight of the national shelter-in-place, Italy's system recorded reductions of 18 to 21 percent for peak and daily energy use relative to the same week in 2019.2

Spain:

  • During the first week of the national shelter-in-place, the Spanish system recorded reductions in weekday peak demand and energy use of up to 15 percent relative to that of the previous week and the same week in 2019.
  • During the second week of the national shelter-in-place, Spain's system recorded reductions of 7 to 10 percent for peak and daily energy use relative to the same week in 2019.

United States:

  • During the first days of city- and state-wide shelter-in-place orders in New York and California, these states recorded a 3 to 7 percent decrease in peak demand and energy use, compared with the previous week and previous years, with morning peak apparently particularly impacted.

"The observed demand reductions are significant, but preliminary data indicate the electric power systems are resilient and can account for and respond to the reductions while reliably meeting customers' needs," said EPRI Vice President of Integrated Grid and Energy Systems Daniel Brooks.

The EPRI analysis also summarizes COVID-19-related actions to protect critical power system workers taken by transmission and distribution operators in various affected regions.It is available for download at EPRI.com.

EPRI is taking steps to minimize the spread of novel coronavirus and to help protect its employees, stakeholders, and communities. For more information about EPRI's response, please click here.

About EPRI
The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI, www.epri.com) is a tax-exempt, non-profit organization, that conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public, on a non-discriminatory basis. An independent organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, health, safety and the environment. EPRI's members represent more than 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to nearly 40 countries. EPRI's principal offices and laboratories are located in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.C.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.

Contact info
Donald Cutler, EPRI
[email protected]
650.847.8077

1 Each region underlying mix of residential, commercial, and industrial electricity demand is different, and the analysis does not normalize the demand data for weather variations that also impact on demand.
2 Despite the reductions in magnitude, the load shape remained largely unchanged, according to premilinary data.

Cision View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/covid-19-related-shutdowns-significantly-affect-regional-electric-use-without-impacting-electric-system-resiliency-reliability-epri-analysis-301031037.html

SOURCE Electric Power Research Institute